Campus Dialogue on Race

November 2 – 6, 2015

Free and Open to Public

Racialization & Education:
Intersections of Power, Pedagogy, & Identity.

The Campus Dialogue on Race (CDOR) is an annual event at Humboldt State University that invites students, staff, faculty, administrators, and community members to present and attend programs that relate to racial justice and its intersections with all forms of oppression and resistance. Our objective is to create spaces and structures for reflection, analysis, dialogue and positive strategies for change. This year's Dialogue will run from November 2-6.

The vision of Campus Dialogue on Race is to achieve racial, social, and environmental justice. The program's mission is to promote and facilitate social and environmental change by engaging a diverse range of individuals, communities, and viewpoints to explore the impact of racism and its intersections with all forms of oppression.

Potential workshop topics might include (but are not limited to):

  • Color Blind Racism/Myth of Post-Racial Society/Modern Racism
  • Analyzing Intersectionality
  • Multi-ethnic Identity/Multiculturalism/False Multiculturalism
  • Politics of Racialization

  • #BlackLivesMatter
  • Immigration and Racialization
  • Civil Unrest/Disobedience
  • Prison Industrial Complex

  • Gender & Sexuality
  • Men & Masculinity
  • Queer People of Color

  • Equity and Identity in Education
  • Decolonizing Institutions (including the University)
  • What Does it Mean to be a Hispanic Serving Institution?
  • Questioning Andro-Centric and Euro-Centric Pedagogy

Keynote Speakers


Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

Dr. Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

Wednesday, Nov. 4
6 – 8pm
Kate Buchanan Room (KBR)

Dr. Eduardo Bonilla-Silva, author of Racism Without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and The Persistence of Racial Inequality in America, is a Professor of Sociology at Duke University.

Website


Edward Brockenbrough

Dr. Edward Brockenbrough

Thursday, Nov. 5
6 – 8pm
Kate Buchanan Room (KBR)

Dr. Edward Brockenbrough directs the Urban Teaching & Leadership Program, a Warner School initiative that prepares urban teachers with a commitment to social justice, at University of Rochester.

Website


HISTORY

HSU Campus Dialogue on Race (CDOR) started in 1998, spurred by President Bill Clinton’s Initiative on Race. He recognized that America was increasingly becoming a multi-racial, multi-ethnic, multi-religious society, making it imperative to identify common values and advance together across our differences. He challenged universities and communities across the nation to begin a very difficult dialogue about race. University campuses hosted town hall meetings, programs, speaker series, and workshops to facilitate the long road toward awareness and progress around complex issues of race.

HSU responded to the call and held its first dialogue on race in 1998 on the first floor of the J, with approximately 80 people in attendance. Over the years, HSU has been committed to creating safe spaces for this important dialogue. CDOR provides an opportunity for students, faculty, staff, and the community to participate in a week or more of workshops, keynote speakers, poster sessions, panel discussions, and dialogues exploring the impact of racism and its intersections with all forms of oppression.

EVENTS SCHEDULE

Download Event Program (pdf)

Monday, Nov. 2

Time Event Location
10am – Noon

Workshop:
Intelligence of Place: A Critical Examination of Wellness and Sustainability from Multiple Perspectives

The discourse on sustainability and wellness have been decontextualized of their meaning to the point that these concepts are not longer grounded in place and tradition. This workshop will provide a tentative definition of wellness and sustainability and connect to the concept of "Intelligence of Place." Various perspectives will provided including Traditional, Structural, and Collective.

Trigger Warning: Discussion issues of oppression, vulnerable populations, and structural violence. Participants may experience discomfort discussing issues that are personal and emotional. To minimize discomfort or possible emotional reactions, participants will be admonished about the content of the workshop and given freedom to leave the room if they are feeling uncomfortable.

Presenter: Dr. César G. Abarca

Goodwin Forum
Noon – 2pm

Workshop:
Reading the body: Stuart Hall’s Discursive Approach to Race

This workshop will introduce participants to the Black British sociologist, Stuart Hall's discursive approach to race. It will be in lecture format, with occasional breakout discussions. Participants will come away with an understanding of the way that race works like a language and the concept of discourse.

Trigger Warning: I will show a short clip that has a photo of a lynching in it. I will be a resource for audience members regarding these reactions to the presentation and I will incorporate small group discussions where they will have an opportunity to process their feelings in a more intimate setting.

Presenter: Dr. Renée Byrd

Goodwin Forum
1 – 3pm

Workshop:
Confronting Bias and Discrimination

How can we best confront/deal with bias and discrimination when we run into it? What are different approaches? Discussion and role playing workshop.

Trigger Warning: Discussing or acting out how to interrupt hostile speech could be a trigger for those who have experienced or witnessed such hostility; however, we do not use any explicit racial slurs or act out "violence." At the beginning of the workshop we will discuss the possibility of folks being triggered and resources that are available (CAPS, different Centers for Academic Excellence, etc.)


Presenter: Dr. Jennifer Eichstedt

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
4:30 – 6:30pm

Workshop:
US Colonial Rule in Puerto Rico “The Oldest Colony in the World”

This presentation will analyze the US colonial laws and motives that have and currently affect the island of Puerto Rico and its citizens. This analysis will present the audience with a detailed history that puts the US colonial actions and legislation into context within the current crisis that is manifesting in the Island today.

Trigger Warning: I will give a warning of the graphic nature and reality of the conquest of Puerto Rico and other lands in the Western Hemisphere. Besides keywords like Genocide and Colonization, i doubt there will be many trigger words. But, I would be mindful of these triggers to ensure a open and safe dialogue.
Presenter: Gregory Xavier Rodriguez

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
5 – 6:30pm

Workshop:
Erotic as Power Zine Launch Party

Presenting a collection of works examining the role of identity politics from academia to the everyday through Audre Lorde's The Uses of the Erotic. Written and edited by HSU students.

Trigger Warning: Issues of trauma, race, and sexuality will come to light in the writing presented in the zine. We will offer a constructive space to articulate these realities. All perspectives offered in the zine work to deconstruct and contest racism, sexism, homophobia, abuse and create understanding and critical perspective. We will issue a trigger warning at the onset of the event and offer personal support for those who need it.

Presenter: Malcolm Chanaiwa

Siemens Hall 108

Tuesday, Nov. 3

Time Event Location
11am – 1pm

Workshop:
Beyond Color-Blind Love?

Proponents and defenders of interracial couples often invoke the notion of “Color-Blind Love” to valorize such couples. But is Color- Blind Love desirable? Is it even possible? We'll explore these questions together as well as the possibility that there might be better ways to think about love and relationships in the context of modern racism.

Presenter: Dr. Brian McElwain

Goodwin Forum
3 – 4:30pm

Workshop:
Behind the Olympics – Black Women’s Lives

American athletes participate in Olympic viewed worldwide. How the public sphere expressed differently from realities on true lives of black women athletes. What does this translate into for the bigger context of history and power of media?

Presenters: Bacilia Bran & Dr. Ramona Bell

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
6 – 8pm

Workshop:
Solidarity: Coalition In Context

Workshop/Presentation. An intersectional analysis of coalition space within young-adult activist organizations from the height of the American Civil Rights Movement. An effort to engage the past and organize for the future.

Presented by: Connor Amans, Gema Quiroz, Gregory Rodriguez, Jesse Pedraza, Marisa Johnson

Trigger Warning: Racism, physical violence will be discussed. The presentation portion will begin with a trigger warning and speak to the importance of prevailing culture of concealing the brutalities of racial discrimination.

Presenter: Connor Amans

Siemens Hall 108

Wednesday, Nov. 4

Time Event Location
9:30 – 11am

Student Workshop with Dr. Bonilla-Silva:
White Logic, White Methods: How Racism Prevents Social Analysts from SEEING the Deep Effect of Race in America

In this workshop, Professor Bonilla-Silva will examine how racism has functioned as sunglasses shading social scientists from seeing how race affects social life. Using sociology as an example, he will argue the insistence by social analysts that race is “declining in significance” or that the problems afflicting people of color derive from their culture or behaviors reflect the deep effect of racism in the discipline. He will provide examples on how the various methods and analytical strategies used by sociologists produce the appearance that racism is on its way out. In the conclusion, he will urge analysts to rethink their methods so as to capture the real significance of race in so-called, post-racial America.

Presenter: Dr. Bonilla-Silva

Goodwin Forum
11am – 1pm

Workshop:
Strategies for Working with Diverse Students

This workshop aims to assess and reflect upon the relationship between intent and impact of becoming a better multicultural educator. In addition, workshop participants will have the opportunity to reject the deficit ideology that lives within education.

Presenter: Merien Townsel

Goodwin Forum
1 – 2:30pm

Staff/Faculty Workshop with Dr. Bonilla-Silva:
The Sweet Enchantment of Color-Blind Racism

The language of race has changed in significant ways in the Post-Civil Rights Era. Gone for the most part are the odious epithets and explicit signage prevalent in Jim Crow America. Yet, a more “civilized” racial discourse has emerged to become the dominant way in which we transact racial affairs. In this workshop, Dr. Bonilla-Silva will examine this new racial discourse, which he terms color-blind racism. Participants will begin to appreciate how color-blind racism works in the academy and discuss concrete strategies for responding to it. Embedded in this conversation is a call for Americans of good conscience to move away from being spectators of racial affairs and become fighters for racial justice.

Presenter: Dr. Bonilla-Silva

Goodwin Forum
3 – 5pm

Workshop:
Deconstructing Humboldt State University’s Assimilation Apparatus

A look into HSU’s historical practice of racism from its foundation to its manifestation within a contemporary context. This workshop will examine the institution's history through anecdotal and archival evidence to understand how the University’s racist foundation continues to have negative impacts on the experiences of students, faculty, staff, and the local tribal community. This will include institutional and interpersonal experiences of discrimination.

Trigger Warning: Potential trigger warning include but are not limited to : boarding schools, racism, historical trauma, colonial soul wounds, and racist experiences at HSU.

Presenter: Tatiana Santibañez

Library Fishbowl
6 – 8pm

Dr. Bonilla-Silva Keynote Presentation:
The Diversity Challenge at HWCUs – On the Urgent Need to Move From Formal Diversity to "Deep-Diversity”

Everyone is for “diversity” in America, yet few organizations and institutions, if any, are truly diverse. In this talk, Professor Bonilla-Silva will examine the case of HWCUs, historically white colleges and universities. He will examine how the history, traditions, curriculum, staff, symbols, and culture of these institutions reproduce whiteness and prevent them from becoming multicultural places. He will conclude by suggesting ideas and practices to transform HWCUs into truly universalistic, democratic, and inclusive institutions of higher learning.

Presenter: Dr. Bonilla-Silva

Kate Buchanan Room

Thursday, Nov. 5

Time Event Location
2 – 3pm

Workshop:
Why You Should Care About Lack of Diversity in Outdoor Spaces

A conversation on the lack of diversity in our national parks and other outdoor spaces and why it should matter to not only the general public, but to government agencies and outdoor organizations alike. Check out this video: https://vimeo.com/134505979



Presenter: Teresa Baker

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
3 – 4:30pm

Workshop with Dr. Edward Brockenbrough:
Teaching LGBTQ Issues in K-12 Schools

The goal of this workshop is to provide conceptual frameworks and practical strategies that will enable educators to address lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) issues in K-12 school settings. Participants will learn key terms and concepts associated with LGBTQ identity development, and explore tactics for curbing bullying and creating classroom communities that are aware of and sensitive to LGBTQ issues. Through the use of film clips, personal reflections, discussions of real-life scenarios, and collaborative problem solving, this workshop will prepare participants to ensure that our schools are safe and welcoming places for all students.Workshop presented by Dr. Edward Brockenbrough, who will provide a keynote @ 6pm in KBR

Presenter: Dr. Edward Brockenbrough

Goodwin Forum
4:30 – 6:30pm

Workshop:
Puerto Rico “The Last Colony”

This workshop is the second part of the series and it will included a well done documentary that breaks down the status issue of Puerto Rico. This documentary's purpose is to provide information to the American public to get them involved in the conversation.

Presenter: Gregory Xavier Rodriguez

Goodwin Forum
6 – 8pm

Keynote with Dr. Edward Brockenbrough:
Black Queer Pedagog – Theory, Practice & Research

Dr. Edward Brockenbrough directs the Urban Teaching & Leadership Program, a Warner School initiative that prepares urban teachers with a commitment to social justice at University of Rochester will provide a keynote.

Presenter: Dr. Edward Brockenbrough

Kate Buchanan Room

Friday, Nov. 6

Time Event Location
12 – 2pm

Workshop:
Let’s Be Real – Deconstructing the Campus Center for Appropriate Technology (CCAT)

This workshop will deconstruct how whiteness, middle class, maleness, physical ability, and heterosexuality is historically tied to Campus Center for Appropriate Technology (CCAT) - a student funded organization at HSU. The CCAT staff wishes to discuss how the organization could move towards a more inclusive narrative.

Trigger Warning: We will have staff available to take students if needed/ A mediator will also be present.

Presenter: Paradise Martinez Graff

Goodwin Forum
2 – 4pm

Workshop:
Student Identity and Microaggressions in an HSI Institution

This workshop is about the intersectionality of various student identities (Ex: Nican Tlaca, Chicano, etc) and microaggressions at at various institutions.

Presenter: Nathaniel McGuigan

Library Fishbowl
2 – 5pm

Film Screening/Workshop:
Exploring Trans Lives – TRANS: THE MOVIE

Screening of TRANS: THE MOVIE followed by a discussion about issues that trans* people face. A panel of local community members share their experiences as trans* individuals. Q&A section included.

Trigger Warning: Trans issues: being outed, suicide, self-harm

Presenter: Lori Cortez-Regan

Goodwin Forum
4 – 6pm

Workshop:
Campus Dialogue on Race Venting Space

This is a participant driven discussion and venting space, supported by staff of the MultiCultural Center, which aims to generate a conversation that will bring up race and other intersections of identity from our experiences here at HSU.

Presenter: Malcolm Chanaiwa

Library Fishbowl
4:30 – 6pm

Workshop:
A Dialog on Dialog – The Communication of Multicultural Awareness

Join the HSU Communication club for an interactive dialogue on the discussion of race and multicultural identity. As communication majors we challenge the current issues and analyze how race is being discussed. We will be examining and asking fundamental questions about the communication of race in order to determine our current level of multicultural awareness.

Presenter: Andrew Thomas

Library 114
6 – 8pm

Film Screening/Discussion:
Untold Story of the Japanese Internment Camps

Screening of TOYO’S CAMERA, followed by a Q & A. This documentary follows the life of a Japanese American photographer before, during, and after World War II. Shows pictures of what life was really like in the internment camps, including the interviews with survivors about their experience.

Presenters: Benjamin Morales & Guy Aronoff

Founders Hall 118

Room Abbreviations:
GF – Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)
NHE – Nelson Hall East
GH – Gist Hall
FH – Founders Hall
SH – Siemens Hall
KBR – Kate Buchanan Room