Campus Dialogue on Race

Mon, October 30 – Fri, November 3, 2017

Free and Open to Public

Beautiful Struggle: Love & Care in a Time of Hate & Violence

The Campus & Community Dialogue on Race (CDOR) is an annual event at Humboldt State University that invites students, staff, faculty, administrators, and community members to present and attend programs that relate to racial justice and its intersections with all forms of oppression and resistance. Our objective is to create spaces and structures for reflection, analysis, dialogue and positive strategies for change. This year's Dialogue will run from October 30 – November 3, 2017.

The vision of Campus & Community Dialogue on Race is to achieve racial, social, and environmental justice. The program's mission is to promote and facilitate social and environmental change by engaging a diverse range of individuals, communities, and viewpoints to explore the impact of racism and its intersections with all forms of oppression. In addition, students can earn a unit of credit in ES 480, Campus & Community Dialogue on Race.

Potential workshop topics might include (but are not limited to):

  • DACA
  • Race, Racism and Racial Justice
  • Ethnic Studies in K-12
  • Fascism and Anti-fascist movements
  • Voter Suppression, voter rights, and radical democracy
  • Whiteness and Related Topics (white fragility, privilege et al.)
  • Housing Insecurity / Access and Legal Services
  • The Politics of health care
  • Reproductive Justice
  • Intersectionality
  • Food sovereignty
  • Citizenship / Border walls and immigration justice
  • Queerness
  • Police state / community accountability
  • Prison industrial complex / restorative justice / transformative justice
  • Decolonization
  • Feminist vegetarian ethics of care
  • Fat / body positivity / Body justice
  • Alternative media / independent media /“fake news” / media bashing
  • Economic justice
  • Reparations
  • Accessibility / disability justice / Neurodiversity
  • Mental health
  • Self care, wellness, and sustainable activism

Dr. Melina Abdullah

Dr. Melina Abdullah

Keynote

Monday, Oct. 30
5 PM
Kate Buchanan Room

Beautiful Struggle: Toppling White Supremacy, Building Black Power

Keynote speaker Dr. Melina Abdullah is a womanist scholar-activist and professor and chair of Pan-African Studies at California State University, Los Angeles. She was part of the historic victory that made ethnic studies a requirement in the Los Angeles Unified School District and was also among the original group of organizers that convened to form Black Lives Matter.

Javier Zamora

Poetry Reading

Thursday, Nov. 2, 3PM

Library Fishbowl

Javier Zamora

Javier Zamora has been invited by the English Dept as the Fall Visiting Writer. He was born in the small El Salvadoran coastal fishing town of La Herradura and immigrated to the U.S. at the age of nine, joining his parents in California.  He is a 2016-2018 Wallace Stegner Fellow at Stanford University.  His much-anticipated new book Unaccompanied explores how immigration and the US-funded Salvadoran Civil War have impacted his family. In his poems, Zamora often engages history, borders, and memory.


get outGET OUT Film Screening & Discussion

Friday, Nov. 3, 6PM

Kate Buchanan Room

Facilitated by Prof. Ramona Bell, Department of Critical Race, Gender, and Sexuality Studies (CRGS)



HISTORY

HSU Campus & Community Dialogue on Race (CDOR) started in 1998, spurred by President Bill Clinton’s Initiative on Race. He recognized that America was increasingly becoming a multi-racial, multi-ethnic, multi-religious society, making it imperative to identify common values and advance together across our differences. He challenged universities and communities across the nation to begin a very difficult dialogue about race. University campuses hosted town hall meetings, programs, speaker series, and workshops to facilitate the long road toward awareness and progress around complex issues of race.

HSU responded to the call and held its first dialogue on race in 1998 on the first floor of the J, with approximately 80 people in attendance. Over the years, HSU has been committed to creating safe spaces for this important dialogue. CDOR provides an opportunity for students, faculty, staff, and the community to participate in a week or more of workshops, keynote speakers, poster sessions, panel discussions, and dialogues exploring the impact of racism and its intersections with all forms of oppression.

WHY DONATE

The Campus/Community Dialogue on Race (CDOR) is committed to keeping its events free and open to the public. Due to high and rising costs for keynote speakers, travel and lodging, CDOR needs to find additional sources of funding each year. In order to expand our dialogue into the surrounding community to provide free and accessible racial equity training opportunities that fits accommodate varying levels of community needs, we need support and partnership from the community. We request: 1) feedback about community interests and priorities for learning/dialogue/workshop offerings; 2) partners to host spaces for those offerings; and 3) financial support for an additional $5,000 in the event budget.

Supporters and sponsors will be listed in the CDOR website and program. Please contact Amanda Staack at 707.826.3365 for more information, or donate online through HSU MultiCultural Center: https://alumni.humboldt.edu/giving/mcc. Checks can be made out to the HSU Advancement Foundation with “Campus Dialogue on Race” in the memo line.
Please send checks to:
Gift Processing Center
SBS 285,
Humboldt State University,
1 Harpst St,
Arcata, CA 95521
Thank you for your leadership and partnership!

EVENTS SCHEDULE

Download Event Program (pdf)

Monday, October 30

Time Event Location
11:00am – 12:30pm

Workshop:
Dialogue with students with Keynote Dr. Melina Abdullah

This is a special session for HSU students. Dr. Abdullah will discuss with students about the history and imperative of student organizing, drawing parallels between the student movements of the 1960s/Black Power era and the Black Lives Matter era.

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
12:00pm – 1:00pm

Workshop:
Cultural Appropriation vs. Cultural Appreciation

With Halloween comes costumes. Sadly, cultures are disregarded, mocked, or simply de-humanized. The aim of this workshop is to bring awareness to attendees in regards to cultural appropriation.

Presenters: Luz Espinoza, Intercultural Intersectional Specialist & Deema Hindawi, Social Justice Summit Coordinator

Vine Deloria Room, MultiCultural Center
1:00pm – 2:30pm

Workshop:
Neutral Spaces, Neo-Nazis, & Taylor Swift: Why and How to Confront Racism in the Classroom

Attempting to maintain a neutral position or classroom is interpreted by white nationalists as a signal that you secretly support their white supremacist ideology. From popular culture to academia, this is a documented phenomenon today that is entirely avoidable. Participants will learn about this phenomenon and discuss, practice, and role-play strategies to confront racist and white supremacist ideology.

Presenters: Tim Miller, Digital Media/Learning Librarian & Tracy Smith, RAMP Director

Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)
1:00pm – 2:30pm

Workshop:
Sex, Silence, and Violence within Communities of Color: Creating Loving Relationships and Communities

A dialogue about sex, shame, and our understanding of healthy sexual relationships through the lens of multiple cultures and identities. Through these conversations we’ll discuss the difficulties in talking about sexualized violence in our communities. Due to the nature of these conversations, this space will be for POC students only.

Presenters: Carmen Peña-Gutierrez, Jayda Kosar, & Skye Peredo, Check-It Peer educators

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
3:00pm – 5:00pm

Workshop:
Microaggressions in Our Community

What are microaggressions? In this session we will discuss what microaggressions are, how microaggressions fit into larger systems of oppression, and practice ways to address them in our on-campus and off-campus community.

Presenters: Christine Mata, Associate Dean of Students, Roger Wang, EOP/Student Support Services Advisor & Tim Miller, Digital Media & Learning Librarian

Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)
5:00pm – 7:00pm

KEYNOTE WITH DR. MELINA ABDULLAH
Beautiful Struggle: Toppling White Supremacy, Building Black Power

Dr. Melina Abdullah is a womanist scholar-activist and professor and chair of Pan-African Studies at CSU Los Angeles. She was part of the historic victory that made ethnic studies a requirement in the Los Angeles Unified School District and was also among the original group of organizers that convened to form Black Lives Matter.

Presenter: Dr. Melina Abdullah

Kate Buchanan Room
7:00pm

A.S. PRESENTS: DIA DE LOS MUERTOS CELEBRATION

La Santa Cecilia, Mexrrissey y Mariachi Flor de Toloache.
$39/general, $10/HSU students. Tickets Available from CenterArts Ticket Office.

Van Duzer Theater

Tuesday, October 31

Time Event Location
11:00am – 12:30pm

Workshop:
It’s More Than Just Talk: ACT

Join in a supportive, authentic, and brave space for building anti-racist vocabulary and support skill development using ACT (Affirm, Counter, Transform), hosted by the members of the Equity Alliance of the North Coast "US" Cohort from HSU. This workshop is about communicating about race and interrupting macro and microaggressions.

Presenters: Equity Alliance of the North Coast HSU Cohort members

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
1:00pm – 3:00pm

Film Screening:
American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs

We will be viewing, "American Revolutionary: The Evolution of Grace Lee Boggs," a documentary on 98-year-old Chinese American writer, activist, and philosopher in Detroit. Grace Lee Boggs was worked in the African American movement for over 70 years and we will discuss how the ADPI community can work with other people of color to build coalitions.

Presenter: Roger Wang, EOP/SSS Advisor & ADPIC Club Advisor

Siemens Hall 108
3:00pm – 5:00pm

Workshop:
“Models for Minorities”: The Asian American Experience and Needs

This panel strives to combat stereotypes -- whether they are seen as positive or negative -- against Asians and discuss the history of Asians in Humboldt County and the United States. It will also cover statistics and data on underrepresented Asian communities and the firsthand experiences of students and community members. We will have a dialogue on the needs of ADPI students and community members.

Presenters: Asian, Desi, Pacific Islander Collective (ADPIC)

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
5:00pm – 7:00pm

Workshop:
White Privilege, the Environment, and Exclusion in Arcata’s Environmental Culture

Arcata is known for its outdoorsy, new-age, open-minded culture. So why is the topic of race often absent from these circles? In this workshop, we will deconstruct the ways in which racism and white privilege have historically operated in the environmental movement and discuss possible solutions towards dismantling white supremacy in Humboldt's environmental culture. We will discuss positionality, strategies for overcoming white fragility, microagressions and how to prevent them, and forms of non-tokenizing inclusion.

Presenters: Samantha Stone, Shanti Balam, & Anais Southard Environmental Studies

Kate Buchanan Room
6:00pm – 7:30pm

Workshop:
Experiencia en Humboldt de trabajad@s e aportadoras a la comunidad local.

Este dialogo/taller se enfocara en la vida cotidiana de vari@s personas hipanohablantes que viven en el condado de Humboldt. Nos enfocaremos en abrir un dialogo respecto al racismo vivido y como también la percepcíon que es el ser educado. Concluiremos con la intersecionalidad de estos dos temas.

Presenters: Martha Rocha, Community Organizer y Carlos Sanchez, Graduate Student

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)

Wednesday, Nov. 1

Time Event Location
9:15am – 10:15am

Workshop:
But Really, Bruh, Like Where You From?

This workshop addresses students’ concerns about unconscious racism in their school community. Participants will learn about intent and impact as well as microaggressions. Students will be invited to reflect upon their experience with microaggressions and unconscious bias. Strategies to name microaggressions and support community members’ self- and other- awareness of their unexamined bias will be considered.

Presenter:Aristea Saulsbury, Greenway Partners and Meridith Oram, MA, RD, Equity Alliance of the North Coast

Arcata High School (For Arcata High School Students Only)
11:00am - 12:30pm

Workshop:
Super Social Justice: A Look at Identity Politics in Comic Books

As comic books and graphic novel characters are reemerging as an influential part of our mainstream culture, it is important to recognize some of the ways they address diversity and inclusion and where they still fall short. This workshop will examine these books and alternative comic options.

Presenters: Ravin Craig, Health Education & Rob Keever, Academic and Career Advising Center

Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)
1:00pm – 2:30pm

Panel Discussion:
Dialogue on Diversity: A Panel Discussion by Child Development Students

The purpose of the proposed session is to increase the awareness and dialogue of diversity on campus and in the community. Using a panel discussion format, we aim at eliciting the discussion on how we can incorporate diversity within HSU courses, students’ future careers and the work with children, families, and communities, and identifying common grounds of care, compassion, and respect.

Presenters: Bethany Phelps & Leslie Ellsworth, Child Development

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
3:00pm – 5:00pm

Workshop:
The Round Story Project: Digital Storytelling Workshop

The Arcata Playhouse is working on The Round Story Project – digital storytelling and story circles to promote dialogue and understanding

Presenters: Jacque Dandeneau, Playhouse Arts/Arcata Playhouse

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
3:00pm – 5:00pm

Film Screening & Discussion:
Making of a Gangsta Documentary Screening

Making of a Gangsta is a documentary based in the Bay Area that focuses on the root issues surrounding the global issue of gangs. The screening focuses on the underlying factors that contribute to the transformation of individuals into the world of gang membership. Discussion with director of the film to follow.

Presenters: Campus Activities Board/Clubs and Activities

Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)
5:00pm – 6:30pm

Workshop:
S.I.S.T.E.R. Circle: Sisters in Spiritual, Transformative and Evolving Relationships

Join us in this brave space where we share our ideas and experiences with sisterhood building that is beyond blood ties and sororities. What is our connection with one another that makes that circle of "girls" so important and relevant to our existence.

Presenters: ​Kenya Uhuru James, Coordinator, AACAE, Tay Triggs, Associate Dean, SEL, Teadja Owens, student, MCC, Consuelo De la Torre, student, SEL

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
5:00pm – 7:00pm

Staged Reading:
Just Like Us, a Staged Reading of the Play by Karen Zacarias

Presentation of the struggles facing documented and undocumented Latina teenage girls in contemporary America. Written by one of the most widely produced Latina playwrights in America, Just Like Us poses difficult, yet essential questions about what makes us American.

Presenters: Department of Theatre, Film & Dance & Latinx Center

Kate Buchanan Room
7:00pm – 8:30pm

Workshop:
Local Perspectives on Reproductive Health Access for Latina Migrants: Creating Support and Mobilizing Allies

Sexual and Reproductive health is tied to social justice, and this workshop looks at how our local community is affected - especially for Latin American/Spanish speaking families. Workshop is based on ethnographic research findings for a master's thesis in the Applied Anthropology department.

Presenter: Corinna Irwin, Applied Anthropology

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)

Thursday, Nov. 2

Time Event Location
11:00am – 12:30pm

Workshop:
We Need to Talk But We Are Stuck

All of us are having a hard time interacting effectively with people who differ from us, particularly those from different races. This engaging and participatory session identifies how people get triggered or stuck in these interactions. It also provides five ways to avoid or manage these triggers so people are able to bring out the best in themselves and in others.

Presenters: Mary V. Gelinas, Ed.D & Roger G. James, Ed.D. Co-Directors of the Cascadia Center for Leadership

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
1:00pm – 3:00pm

Workshop
Light-Skin/White Passing Privilege Dialogue

In order for POC communities to combat anti-blackness and colorism we must address our own internal contradictions. "Don't forget, you are accepted in the community and important, you must just remember to always check your privileges." (Nancy Garcia)

Presenters: Destino Garcia, M.E.Ch.A., Sociology, Jazmin Sandoval, M.E.Ch.A.

Siemens Hall 108
3:00pm – 4:30pm

Poetry Reading
Javier Zamora

Javier Zamora has been invited by the English Department as the Fall Visiting Writer. His much anticipated new book Unaccompanied explores how immigration and the US-funded Salvadoran Civil War have impacted his family. In his poems, Zamora often engages history, borders, and memory. In 2015 he co-organized the group Undocupoets. 

Presenter: Javier Zamora

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
4:00pm – 7:00pm

CELEBRATION
El dia de los muertos

We​ ​will​ ​be​ ​having​ ​a​ ​Dia​ ​de​ ​los​ ​Muertos​ ​celebration​ ​at​ ​the​ ​parking​ ​lot​ ​next​ ​to​ ​the​ ​MCC.​ ​The event​ ​will​ ​include​ ​food,​ ​music,​ ​Danza​ ​Azteca,​ ​Ballet​ ​Folklorico​ ​de​ ​Humboldt​ ​and​ ​a​ ​saw​ ​dust ceremony.​ ​We​ ​will​ ​have​ ​workshops​ ​going​ ​over​ ​the​ ​importance​ ​of​ ​the​ ​difference​ ​between​ ​cultural appropriation​ ​and​ ​cultural​ ​appreciation​ ​and​ ​​ ​the​ ​significance​ ​of​ ​Dia​ ​de​ ​los​ ​Muertos/the differences​ ​between​ ​halloween​ ​and​ ​Dia​ ​de​ ​los​ ​Muertos. ​

Multicultural Center
5:00pm

Workshop:
Dia de los muertos significance and compare contrast to Halloween

This workshop consists of explaining background information on The Day of the Dead, and differentiating it from Halloween. In addition, we will reflect how at times both events get convoluted into one.

Presenters: Joselin Dorado, Cultural Centers Liaison

Vine Deloria Room, Multicultural Center
5:00pm – 7:00pm

Workshop:
Black and Blue Dialogue

There will be a short film screening with a discussion at the end. Officers throughout Humboldt County will answer and ask questions from the audience and the AACAE staff.

Presenters: Entire staff and faculty of AACAE

Kate Buchanan Room
6:00pm – 8:00pm

Workshop:
Exploring the Dynamics of Oppression Through a Buddhist Perspective

The spacious perspective of the Great Perfection Teachings of Tibetan Buddhism can be a useful support for understanding how we are all conditioned by a narrative that perpetuates racism and other forms of oppression. Understanding this conditioning and how we are situated within the social structures that implement oppression can open possibilities for making different choices and begin to step out of the cycles of suffering and disconnection. This presentation will include talks, discussion and experiential exercises. Meditation experience helpful but not necessary.

Presenters: H. Margarita Loinaz, M.D., Buddhist Teacher at the East Bay & Spirit Rock Mediation Centers Integrating Social Justice and Environmental Awareness with Spiritual Development

Library Fishbowl (Room 209)
6:00pm – 7:30pm

Special Talk:
Glenn Harris: From Status Quo to Beloved Community: Benefits to Communities Pursuing Racial Equity

Glenn Harris, President of Center for Social Inclusion will give a talk titled From Status Quo to Beloved Community: Benefits to Communities Pursuing Racial Equity.  This event is sponsored by Equity Alliance of the North Coast. RSVP to Glenn Harris.

Humboldt County Office of Education, Sequoia Conference Center, 901 Myrtle Avenue, Eureka
6:00pm – 8:00pm

FILM SCREENING/WORKSHOP/DISCUSSION:
Students Promoting Institutional Equity

SPIE is intended to serve as a prequel for future student documentation and activism, juxtaposing HSU as a case study of the larger CSU system, and academia at large. SPIE centers indigeneity, colonialism, resurgence and decolonization as its theoretical lenses.

Presenter: Alicia Flores, Film Major/Anthropology Minor

Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall 102)

Friday, Nov. 3

Time Event Location
11:00am – 1:00pm

Workshop:
Strategies for Defusing Defensiveness When Confronting Our Privilege

Participants will receive and reflect on specific tools and strategies for recognizing, naming and navigating personal defensiveness that may arise when confronting our own power and privilege, as well as systemic and implicit bias. Content will draw on the concept of 'white fragility' but will include an intersectional analysis applicable to all folks. Content will also include demonstration of mindfulness and grounding practices.

Presenter: Yvonne Doble, MSW, Social Work

Library Fish Bowl (Room 209)
1:00pm – 3:00pm

Workshop:
Racism 101: The Internalized and Interpersonal Dimensions

This workshop addresses the internalized and interpersonal dimensions of racism, defined as having four components: internalized, interpersonal, institutional, and systemic. Participants will review common language used to discuss racial equity as well as examine how living in a culture of white supremacy impacts how we see ourselves, how we see others, and how we interact with everyone, consciously and unconsciously. RSVP for Racism 101 on November 3.

Presenters: Cori Jara, Lead Case Manager, McKinleyville Family Resource Center & Meridith Oram, MA, RD, Equity Alliance of the North Coast

Ten Pin Building, 793 K Street, Arcata
3:00pm – 5:00pm

Workshop:
Asian, Desi, Pacific Islander Students – Invisible Population at PWIs?

We will be exploring the Asian Desi Pacific Islander student experience at predominantly white institutions (PWI) and how systems of higher education continue to view these students as model minorities. We will be exploring the model minority myth, myths about ADPI students in higher education, micro-aggressions against ADPI students, and what HSU can do to recognize these students and make their needs visible and support them.

Presenters: Roger Wang, EOP/Student Support Services Advisor & Dayne Menardo, Counseling & Psychological Services

Library Fish Bowl (Room 209)
6:00pm – 9:00pm

Film Screening & Discussion:
GET OUT

Now that Chris and his girlfriend, Rose, have reached the meet-the-parents milestone of dating, she invites him for a weekend getaway upstate with Missy and Dean. At first, Chris reads the family’s overly accommodating behavior as nervous attempts to deal with their daughter’s interracial relationship, but as the weekend progresses, a series of increasingly disturbing discoveries lead him to a truth that he could have never imagined. A discussion of Jordan Peele's 2017 film, facilitated by Dr. Ramona Bell, will follow the screening.

Presenter: Dr. Ramona Bell, Associate Professor, Critical Race, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Kate Buchanan Room

Room Abbreviations:
GF – Goodwin Forum (Nelson Hall East 102)
NHE – Nelson Hall East
SH – Siemens Hall
KBR – Kate Buchanan Room