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Geography professors Matthew Derrick and Rosemary Sherriff co-edited the 2018 issue of The California Geographer, the flagship peer-reviewed journal of the California Geographical Society. The volume—weighing in at more than 270 pages, the largest in journal’s nearly six-decade history—features articles from HSU Geography faculty, including Derrick and Nicholas Perdue, and former students, including Nathaniel Douglass and Eric Fowler, as well as academic geographers from throughout the state. The 2018 issue marks the second year of Derrick and Sherriff editing the journal; it can be accessed at the following link: http://scholarworks.csun.edu/handle/10211.3/203086

On a weekend in late September 2018, more than twenty Humboldt State Geography students, led by professors Matthew Derrick and Rosemary Sherriff, hopped in vans for a three-day field study that included an investigation into the impacts of the recent Carr Fire and an exploration natural beauty of Lassen Volcanic National Park. 

The Carr Fire, reported as one of the most destructive fires in California’s history, started on July 23, 2018, near Whiskeytown off Highway 299. Before being fully contained in late August, the conflagration spread nearly 230,000 acres across Trinity and Shasta counties, destroying more than 1,000 residences—mainly in and around west Redding—and claiming the lives of three firefighters. 

On the first day of the field study, the Humboldt geographers met with Tom Garcia, a firefighter at National Park Service, and Eric Knapp, a research ecologist with the US Forest Service. Starting at the Whiskeytown National Recreation Area, students listened to Garcia as he discussed the origins of the fire and the damage it inflicted in and around the park. Garcia also explained, through a guided—and nearly off-road—tour of park land impacted by the Carr Fire, the National Park Service’s efforts to ameliorate the worst effects of forest fires through controlled burns. 

After surveying some of the fire’s impacts to the park land, the HSU geographers continued with Knapp to examine some of the devastation inflicted on human settlements, including the destruction of homes and human life by what has been reported as the state’s worst-ever fire tornado. According to Knapp, the fire vortex, which claimed the life of Redding-based firefighter Jeremy Stoke, was so unusual that fire ecologists and other experts are still grappling to understand it. 
Students and faculty alike were struck, sometimes on a very emotional level, by the landscapes of destruction they viewed in relatively wealthy neighborhoods located in west Redding at the wildland-urban interface. Fire razed some homes to their foundations while neighboring homes stood seemingly unscathed, leaving an impression of randomness in scorched path. However, as Knapp explained, while a degree of randomness characterized the fire, choices in home building materials, efforts to stave off air flow in and out of houses, relative location vis-à-vis the wildland, and other pertinent variables help explain resultant geographic patterns of destruction and clemency. 

Following their examination of the Carr Fire, the HSU geographers traveled out to Lassen Volcanic National Park, where they set up camp for two days. Faculty led a series of explorations, including a hike to the top of Lassen Peak, surveying the natural beauty and wonder found in the park’s landscapes.

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Micah Wright and Rosemary Sherriff published a new article on climate change impacts in forests in Southwest Alaska with National Park Service collaborators in the open-access journal Ecosphere. Results suggest that historically productive forests in Southwest Alaska are showing declines in growth under warmer conditions, with important implications for future forest conditions and productivity. Our results corroborate climate change model forecasts for the region. Article weblink: https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.2462

PermaLinks: http://now.humboldt.edu/achievements/10650/

Madelinn Schriver (MS 2015, Forestry and Wildland Resources), Rosemary Sherriff, and US Forest Service and UC Cooperative Extension collaborators published an article on oak woodlands along a gradient of conifer encroachment in northwestern California in the journal Ecosphere. The study highlights (1) the process and severity of encroachment is consistent across the region, resulting in substantial oak habitat loss and a shift toward conifer dominance in formerly diverse woodlands of northwestern California; and (2) oak woodlands require concerted management effort to ensure their future persistence. Article weblink: https://doi.org/10.1002/ecs2.2446

PermaLink: http://now.humboldt.edu/achievements/10651/

Geography professors Matthew Derrick and Rosemary Sherriff co-edited the 2018 issue of The California Geographer, the flagship peer-reviewed journal of the California Geographical Society. The volume—weighing in at more than 270 pages the largest in journal’s nearly six-decade history—features articles from HSU Geography faculty, including Derrick Nicholas Perdue, and former students, including Nathaniel Douglass and Eric Fowler, as well as academic geographers from throughout the state. The 2018 issue marks the second year of Derrick and Sherriff editing the journal; it can be accessed at the following link: http://scholarworks.csun.edu/handle/10211.3/203086
 
Permalink: http://now.humboldt.edu/achievements/10620/

Over the last year, students in GEOG 300, Global Awareness, and GEOG 301, Int’l Environmental Issues and Globalization, published papers on public blogs under the instruction of Dr. Laura Johnson.
 
Students in GEOG 300 created an ‘Encyclopedia of Objects of Concern,’ in which they creatively examined how seemingly mundane, ordinary objects connect people, places, and beings across the globe. Check it out here: https://humboldtglobalawareness.weebly.com
 
And in GEOG 301, students collectively developed case studies of resistance, re-imagining, and re-building, collaborating to probe innovative movements, organizations, and frameworks. Check it out here: https://reimaginetheworld.weebly.com
 
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Congratulations to our 2018 Geography scholarship recipients! At the annual awards BBQ, scholarships and awards were distributed thanks to the generosity of alumni and other donors. A new Kosmos award was created this year for leadership and creativity in geospatial science and cartography. Congratulations to recipients Miyako Namba (Dr. John L. Harper Memorial Scholarship), Hartford Johnson (Herring Geography Scholarship), Quint Migliardi (Dr. Joseph S. Leeper Scholarship), Kevin Greer (Suzanne Wetzel Seemann Scholarship), Amy Lautamo (Webb Bauer Award), Andrew Gibbs (Excellence of Scholarship, National Council for Geographic Education), Joshua Shindelbower and Gilbert Trejo (Kosmos Awards)
 
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Humboldt came home with several top awards from the 72nd Annual California Geographical Society meeting in Sacramento. The 18 current students, along with alumni, who attended represented HSU Geography with strong enthusiasm and professionalism.
 
We had three student awardees. Samuel Wood won first place for the Cartography Paper Competition. Joshua Shindelbower won second place for the Cartography Paper Competition. Quint Migliardi won third place for the Digital Cartography Competition, and several of our students landed Student Travel Awards. Well done!
 
Photos and more information here.
 
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HSU Geography Announces China/Tibet Field Studies Program for Summer 2019. As part of its continuing global outreach, the HSU Geography Department is again offering the China/Tibet Field Studies Program. Since the beginning of the program in 2000 HSU undergraduate students have pursued a wide range of topics while exploring and documenting the rapidly changing natural and cultural landscapes of these regions. The design and implementation of a community service project on the Tibetan Plateau will be a hallmark of next year’s program. Open to all majors, prerequisite courses are scheduled for Spring 2019. For more information, contact Tony Rossi, program director at afr2@humboldt.edu
 
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Alum Michael Vernon (MS 2017) with Rosemary Sherriff (Geography), Jeff Kane (Forestry), and Phil van Mantgem (USGS) published a paper titled “Thinning, tree-growth, and resistance to multi-year drought in a mixed-conifer forest of northern California” in the journal Forest Ecology and Management.
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foreco.2018.03.043
 
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