Humboldt State UniversityHumboldt State University

A transformative professional development program focused on creating collaboration at work and in your communities

Skip to main content

Five Core Courses

To earn a certificate, you must complete five core courses for a total of 5.5 units.

Courses are non-credit, with a credit option. Courses may be taken individually; completion of certificate is not required.

Graduates of the Cascadia Center for Leadership 10-day program need only complete Foundations of Meeting Mastery, Advanced Meeting Mastery, and Designing Collaborative Processes to be eligible for the certificate.

Self Mastery: Who You Are Leads

Date: Fri., Jan. 6, 2017

Commitment: 15 hours

Fee: $175  •   Academic Credit (optional): .5 unit, $25

Increase your ability to make conscious and considered choices about how to behave as a leader in everyday and difficult situations.

  By the end of this course we hope you...

Constructive & Productive Interactions

This class has been cancelled. Next offering: Fall 2017

Commitment: 15 hours

Fee: $350  •   Academic Credit (optional): 1 unit, $50

 

Learn to interact at work and in your communities in ways that strengthen the quality of everyone's thinking, relationships and decision-making.

  • Understand the critical role that interactions play in leading
  • Understand why and how people misperceive and "trigger" one another
  • Have tools to develop embodied mindfulness
  • Are better able to make conscious choices about when to use which skills
  • Are able to listen more skillfully
  • Know how to ask good questions
  • Are able to distinguish between what you think is going on from what is actually occurring
  • Say what you think in an inclusive and embodied way
  • Have the skills to effectively manage difficult conversations

Materials:

  • 100-page workbook: “Communication and Leadership Skills for Productive Interactions” by Mary Gelinas, Ed.D. and Roger James, Ed.D.

Advanced preparation required:

Students are required to read one of the following books prior to class and prepare a brief presentation on their most important learnings:

  • Crucial Conversations or Crucial Confrontations by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, and Al Switzler (New York: McGraw Hill, 2002 and 2005)
  • Change Your Questions: Change Your Life by Marilee Adams (San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler, 2004)
  • Difficult Conversations: How To Discuss What Matters Most by Douglas Stone, Bruce Patton and Sheila Heen (New York: Viking, 1999)
  • Fierce Conversations by Susan Scott (New York: Berkley Books, 2004)
  • The Five Keys to Mindful Communication (Boston: Shambala Press, 2012)
  • Nonviolent Communication by Marshall B. Rosenberg (Encinatis, CA: Puddle Dancer Press, 2005)
  • Saying What’s Real by Susan Campbell (Tiburon, CA: New World Library, 2005)
  • Humble Inquiry: The Gentle Art of Asking Instead of Telling by Edgar H. Schein (San Francisco, CA: 2013)
  • Talk Matters! Saving the World One Word at a Time by Mary V. Gelinas (Victoria, BC: Friesen Press, 2016)


Effective Meetings: The Key to Getting Things Done

Date: Thurs-Fri., May 11 & 12, 2017

Commitment: 15 hours

Fee: $350  •   Academic Credit (optional): 1 unit, $50

Acquire a set of tools to plan and conduct meetings, get and stay focused, and handle difficult behaviors.

  • Define concrete desired outcomes for meetings
  • Develop detailed agendas to achieve those outcomes
  • Determine which approach to making decisions is appropriate
  • Use various process tools in addition to discussion
  • Use various facilitative behaviors to keep a meeting on track
  • Have tools to develop embodied mindfulness
  • Are better able to make conscious choices about how to handle difficult situations
  • Create a "group memory"
  • Open and close meetings to build understanding and commitment

Materials:

  • 150-page workbook: Foundations of Meeting Mastery by Mary Gelinas, Ed.D. and Roger James, Ed.D.

Advanced preparation required:

Students are required to read one of the following books prior to class and prepare a brief presentation on their most important learnings:

  • Facilitator’s Guide to Participatory Decision-Making by Sam Kaner (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2007)
  • How To Make Meetings Work by Michael Doyle and David Strauss (New York: Jove, 1986)
  • How To Make Collaboration Work by David Straus (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2002)
  • Solving Tough Problems by Adam Kahane (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2004)
  • Visual Meetings by David Sibbet (New Jersey: Wiley & Sons, 2010)
  • The Wisdom of Group Decisions by Craig Freshley (Brunswick, ME: Good Group Decisions, 2010)
  • Don't Just Do Something, Stand There: Ten Principles for Meetings That Matter by Marvin Weisbord and Sandra Janoff (San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler, 2007)
  • Talk Matters! Saving the World One Word at a Time by Mary V. Gelinas (Victoria, BC: Friesen Press, 2016)

Advanced Meeting Leadership for High-Stakes Meetings

Date: August 16-18, 2017 (three days)

Commitment: 22.5 hours

Fee: $525  •   Academic Credit (optional): 1.5 units, $75

Learn and practice strategies and techniques to facilitate high-stakes meetings with complex power and group dynamics.
Pre-requisites: Successful completion of Effective Meetings OR comparable experience in leading meetings.

  • Help groups solve problems and make wise decisions faster
  • Define purpose and outcomes for high-stakes meetings in neutral and inclusive terms
  • Use various models to plan and conduct complex meetings
  • Define stakeholders and identify their appropriate level of involvement in decision-making
  • Stay grounded and continue to help people who are in conflict move forward
  • Make conscious choices about how to handle difficult situations
  • Use multiple process tools and facilitative behaviors
  • Develop collaborative agreements among diverse participants
  • Make course corrections when a meeting needs to change direction
  • Use body language, pace and tone to keep a meeting moving forward

Materials:

  • 100-page workbook: Designing Collaborative Processes for Communities and Organizations by Mary Gelinas, Ed.D. and Roger James, Ed.D.
  • Engagement Streams Framework, National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation, Revised August, 2014. Available at www.ncdd.org/rc/item/2142
  • Meaningful Public Conversations by Mary V. Gelinas and Roger G. James. Available at www.gelinasjames.com

Advanced preparation required:

Students are required to read one of the following books prior to class and prepare a brief presentation on their most important learnings:

  • The Change Handbook: The Definitive Resource on Today’s Best Methods for Engaging Whole Systems, 2nd ed. by Peggy Holman, Tom Devane, and Steve Cady (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2007
  • The Circle Way by Christina Baldwin (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2010)
  • Community: The Structure of Belonging by Peter Block (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2008)
  • Future Search: Getting the Whole System in the Room for Vision, Commitment, and Action, 3rdd Ed. by Marvin Weisbord and Sandra Janoff (San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler, 2010)
  • Dialogue by Linda Ellinor and Glenna Gerard (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1998)
  • The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook: Strategies and Tools for Building A Learning Organization by Peter Senge, Art Kleiner, Charlotte Roberts, Richard Ross, and Bryan Smith (New York: Doubelday, 1994)
  • Open Space Techology by Harrison Own (Potomac, MD: Abbott Publishing, 1992)
  • Terms of Engagement: New Ways of Leading and Changing Organizations, 2nd ed. by Richard Axelrod (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2010)
  • You Don’t Have To Do It Alone: How to Involve Others to Get Things Done by Richard Axelrod, Emily Axelrod, Julie Beedon, and Robert Jacobs (San Francsico: Berrett-Koehler, 2004)
  • The World Café by Juanita Brown (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2005)
  • Public Participation for 21st Century Democracy by Tina Nabatchi and Matt Leighninger (New Jersey: Jossey-Bass, 2015)
  • Systems Thinking for Social Change: A Practical Guide to Solving Complex Problems, Avoiding Unintended Consequences, and Achieving Lasting Results by David Peter Stroh (White River Junction, VT: Green Publishing, 2015)
  • Talk Matters! Saving the World One Word at a Time by Mary V. Gelinas (Victoria, BC: Friesen Press, 2016)

Designing Multi-Stakeholder Collaborative Change Processes

Date: Thurs.-Fri., Oct. 25-27, 2017

Commitment: 30 hours

Fee: $525  •   Academic Credit (optional): 2 units, $100

Develop the ability to design collaborative and inclusive multi-stakeholder processes to solve complex problems, resolve conflicts, develop a vision, craft a policy, or create change.

  • Design effective collaborative and inclusive multi-stakeholder change processes
  • Understand various change models and use them to develop "process maps"
  • Define key stakeholders, and their various levels of involvement
  • Understand various ways to engage stakeholders
  • Understand how to help people make transitions as the process and/or change unfold
  • Differences between conducting change processes in organizations and communities
  • Know how to develop education, communication and outreach plans

Materials:

  • 100-page workbook: Designing Collaborative Processes for Communities and Organizations by Mary Gelinas, Ed.D. and Roger James, Ed.D.
  • Engagement Streams Framework, National Coalition for Dialogue & Deliberation, Revised August, 2014. Available at www.ncdd.org/rc/item/2142
  • Meaningful Public Conversations by Mary V. Gelinas and Roger G. James. Available at www.gelinasjames.com

Advanced preparation required:

Students are required to read one of the following books prior to class and prepare a brief presentation on their most important learnings:

  • The Change Handbook: The Definitive Resource on Today’s Best Methods for Engaging Whole Systems, 2nd ed. by Peggy Holman, Tom Devane, and Steve Cady (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2007
  • The Circle Way by Christina Baldwin (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2010)
  • Community: The Structure of Belonging by Peter Block (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2008)
  • Future Search: Getting the Whole System in the Room for Vision, Commitment, and Action, 3rdd Ed. by Marvin Weisbord and Sandra Janoff (San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler, 2010)
  • Dialogue by Linda Ellinor and Glenna Gerard (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1998)
  • The Fifth Discipline Fieldbook: Strategies and Tools for Building A Learning Organization by Peter Senge, Art Kleiner, Charlotte Roberts, Richard Ross, and Bryan Smith (New York: Doubelday, 1994)
  • Open Space Techology by Harrison Own (Potomac, MD: Abbott Publishing, 1992)
  • Terms of Engagement: New Ways of Leading and Changing Organizations, 2nd ed. by Richard Axelrod (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2010)
  • You Don’t Have To Do It Alone: How to Involve Others to Get Things Done by Richard Axelrod, Emily Axelrod, Julie Beedon, and Robert Jacobs (San Francsico: Berrett-Koehler, 2004)
  • The World Café by Juanita Brown (San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2005)
  • Public Participation for 21st Century Democracy by Tina Nabatchi and Matt Leighninger (New Jersey: Jossey-Bass, 2015)
  • Systems Thinking for Social Change: A Practical Guide to Solving Complex Problems, Avoiding Unintended Consequences, and Achieving Lasting Results by David Peter Stroh (White River Junction, VT: Green Publishing, 2015)
  • Talk Matters! Saving the World One Word at a Time by Mary V. Gelinas (Victoria, BC: Friesen Press, 2016)

 

Elective Courses

The following courses are optional and are not required to obtain the certificate.

Graphic Recording

Date: Thurs., March 16, 2017

Commitment: 7 hours

Fee: $175 (Non-credit)

​Graphic recording serves meeting participants by writing and drawing their conversation live and large to help them do their work. It's a powerful tool to help people feel heard, develop shared understandings and be able to see their work in real-time.​

  • Practice public listening, lettering, and core drawing skills of graphic recording
  • Gain hands-on practice recording with blank paper, using several visual templates to focus a group's conversation
  • Develop and share graphic icons for graphic recording

Consulting Skills

Date: Wed., Thurs. & Fri., Feb. 15-17, 2017

Commitment: 22.5 hours

Fee: $525  •   Academic credit (optional): 1.5 units, $75

Increase your ability to have a strong and positive impact on your client's results as a staff person or external consultant.

  • Know how to have your expertise and experience more fully utilized and get your recommendations implemented
  • Be able to establish and maintain effective partnerships with clients
  • Know the phases of the consulting process
  • Identify the skills necessary for the process
  • Be able to apply the eight keys to effective consulting including:
    • Being skillfully authentic
    • Building clear agreements
    • Managing resistance and resolving conflicts

Materials:

  • 300-page workbook: Consulting Skills: Bringing Your Authentic Self Forward by Mary Gelinas, Ed.D. and Roger James, Ed.D.

Advanced preparation required:

Students are required to read one of the following books prior to class and prepare a brief presentation on their most important learnings:

  • Flawless Consulting, 3rd ed.  by Peter Block (San Francisco: Pfeiffer, 2011)
  • The Consultant’s Calling by Geoffrey M. Bellman (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1990)
  • Consulting on the Inside by Beverly Scott (Alexandria, VA: American Society for Training and Development, 2000)
  • The Conscious Consultant by Kristine Quade and Renee M. Brown (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2002)
  • Helping: How to Offer, Give, and Receive Help by Edgar H. Schein (San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler, 2009)
  • Process Consultation Revisited: Building Helping Relationships by Edgar H. Schein (Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1999)

 

BACK TO TOP